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Posts Tagged ‘marginalization’

By Rev Dr Young Lee Hertig, Symposium Organizer

The third Asian American Equipping Symposium, entitled “Healing of Memories,” took place at Fuller Theological Seminary on March 19-20, 2012. Its objective was to create a space for Asian American male and female leaders to understand the interdependent dimensions of pain within our families and churches — for as one part of the body suffers, the whole body suffers. (more…)

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Photo by kevindooley

By Young Lee Hertig, as published in CBE‘s Arise E-Newsletter

Every leader can point to numerous mentors who have refreshed and renewed them like an oasis in the desert. These are people who foresee our potential and guide us to reach our God-given calling in life. My PhD mentor, Paul G. Hiebert, was a third-generation Mennonite missionary to India and a professor at Fuller Theological Seminary in the 1980s and 1990s. (more…)

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By Margaret Yu

I have a love-hate relationship with Mike.  No, not a person, but the lapel microphone I call my friend, Mike.

I love Mike because it helps me to have a voice.  I have a soft voice and do not like to raise it.  Mike allows me to speak in my own style without screaming.  Specifically, I love Mike because it was made to give speakers the freedom to teach with hands free for other instructional purposes. (more…)

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Created by Angel Wu in March 2009

Angel Wu is the expansion director of INHERITANCE magazine. She graduated Fuller Theological Seminary in 2010 with an MDiv in Worship, Theology and the Arts.  Angel’s hobbies include photography, reading, window shopping and football, as well as writing and performing her own songs. She currently attends Evergreen Baptist Church of Los Angeles.

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By 화이남

by Chloe Sun

God often takes us from familiar contexts to unfamiliar places in order to shake our perspectives about life, to shatter our old belief systems, and to transform our mind and soul. This past December and January, I made a trip to Hong Kong and God did just that.

I spent most of my teenage years in Hong Kong. It was once a familiar place. Ever since I came to the U.S., I have made several trips back home. Every trip seemed to create mixed feelings (more…)

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Photo by Reinante El Pinto del Fuego

by Chloe Sun

This May, I had the opportunity to teach a two-week intensive course in Paris.  My students were primarily blue-collar Chinese immigrants.  Some work at local restaurants in Chinatown, some work at clothing stores and others have no steady jobs.  Some left their families in China and came to Paris in search of a better life.  Others came with their families, and are waiting for years and even decades to become legal residents. Most  of them have not integrated into the mainstream Paris structure and culture. They live on the margin of society both socially and physically, subject to the rules and regulations of Paris’ government for their survival and welfare. (more…)

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Photo by linh.ngân

by Chloe Sun

I have always perceived myself as a foreigner in America.  My parents were born and raised in Vietnam.  I was born in China, raised in Hong Kong and came to the U.S. for college about twenty years ago.  Identity became an ever more prominent issue when I came to teach at a seminary that was predominantly Taiwanese in Los Angeles. (more…)

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