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Posts Tagged ‘shame’

Photo by Joel Olives

Photo by Joel Olives

By Joy Wong

In terms of “give-and-take” in relationships, this time in my life — as a full-time mom of two kids ages 3 and 1 — has definitely been a season of taking. Taking sounds easy, but for me, it’s not. I like to be the giver, the contributor, the leader — using my gifts and talents for the benefit of others. (Some may argue that I am, in fact, giving to my kids. This is true, but I am speaking in terms of my relationship with the church.) (more…)

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Photo by amanda tipton

Photo by amanda tipton

By Dorcas Cheng-Tozun

It was a typical toddler meltdown. My two-year-old, overtired and over-stimulated, wouldn’t talk to anyone or eat any of the food we put in front of him. Instead, he retreated into a corner of the room to wail.

But the scene, which took place a couple months ago, was anything but typical. (more…)

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Photo by Luigi Morante

Photo by Luigi Morante

By Dorcas Cheng-Tozun

When I started managing Chinese National employees while living in the industrial city of Shenzhen, China, the biggest challenge to my cross-cultural relationships was not language, as I expected it to be. Nor was it my ignorance of Chinese labor law or typical business practices. It was, to my great surprise, the concept of face. (more…)

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Photo by m01229

Photo by m01229

By Dorcas Cheng-Tozun

I have a confession to make: I’m not very good at using those self-checkout machines at the grocery store. Somehow I end up losing track of which items I’ve scanned, or my reusable bags mess up the weighing mechanism and the attendant on duty has to release me from a locked system. (more…)

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Photo by Tony the Misfit

By Joy Wong

All my life, I have had an unexplainable aversion to large groups of Asian Americans.  For instance, when my husband Will wanted to check out a dumpling food truck that was swarming with Asian Americans, I felt a strong inner reluctance to approach that crowd.  Another example — when I first started college, I initially felt a repulsion to the Asian American campus fellowship.  Most of the time, I attributed this reaction to my introverted tendencies — but why the aversion to Asian Americans in particular?

It’s only recently that I’ve begun to unpack this strange reaction.  (more…)

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Photo by seyed mostafa zamani

Shared by Yonnie Cheng

What have you been learning lately?

I’ve been in Taiwan this past year as a missionary, and it’s only very recently that I’ve realized that for most of my life until now, I didn’t like Taiwan; I didn’t like “Asianness.” Without realizing it, I had always judged how my parents and grandparents lived in Taiwan (more…)

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Jessica Chen is a full-time doctoral student at Loma Linda in Marital & Family Therapy. She has an MFT degree from Fuller Theological Seminary as well as a BA in Design Media Arts from UCLA.  Her favorite food is “niu rou mien” (translation: beef noodle soup), and her favorite hobbies include calligraphy and spending time with Madeleine, her miniature schnauzer.

What are your ministry passions?  How did you discern these passions in your life?

While growing up in a Taiwanese American church, I started mentoring sisters and seeing a lot of things I didn’t know how to address from a purely biblical point of view.  (more…)

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