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Posts Tagged ‘marginalization’

Photo by Chris Smith Ronnie Shumate

Photo by Chris Smith Ronnie Shumate

By Young Lee Hertig

The term “the bamboo ceiling” coined by Jane Hyun describes the virtual absence of Asian Americans in top corporate CEO positions despite significant numbers of Asian American students at Harvard (18%) and Stanford (24%). On October 14, 2014, an article called “Cracking the Bamboo Ceiling” posted in The Atlantic stated that Asian Americans account for just 1.4% of Fortune 500 CEOs and 1.9% of corporate officers overall. (more…)

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Photo by FrauSchütze

Photo by FrauSchütze

By Diana Gee

There’s a passage in the gospel of John that has often been used to exemplify the compassion and righteousness of Christ towards his sinful followers. In John 7:53-8:11, we read the story of a woman caught in adultery. The religious authorities (a group of men) brought her to the temple courts where Jesus was teaching. (more…)

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Photo by Ken Fong

Photo by Ken Fong

By Vivian Mabuni

I walk each day as an Asian American Christian woman drifting between four separate worlds (Asian. American. Christian. Woman.). These worlds often have opposing values that affect my mindset and how I respond and make decisions.

I grew up in Boulder, CO one of a handful of Asian Americans in a graduating class of 650. My dad was a producer and director for the Colorado Shakespeare Festival. When I was nine years old, he directed Romeo and Juliet and I would accompany him to the rehearsals. He mentioned in passing that I would never play the lead role of Juliet because I was Chinese. (more…)

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By Mihee Kim-Kort

I know. It’s a little cliche. A little Joy Luck Club meets Mulan. An Asian mother teaching her Asian daughter to do origami.

My mother taught me to make paper cranes when I was young. We sat at the kitchen table and took regular, white copy paper, folded the paper over in a triangle so it made a perfect square and creased the bottom so that we could carefully tear it off and discard it. After that it was “fold here, open here, bend here, fold again…”  Before long, a perfect paper crane materialized in front of us. For the longest time, this picture of my mother and me connecting over such a simple but almost magical object has stayed with me. (more…)

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By Melanie Mar Chow

In mid-July, a magazine covered the 40th anniversary of Title IX, a law passed in 1972 that requires gender equity for boys and girls in every educational program that receives federal funding.  It was authored by Patsy Mink, a Japanese American woman educator, and the law set in motion a change in athletics as well — the repercussions of which are particularly significant in this year’s Olympic Games, as the US female athletes out-medalled the men, 58 to 45. More significantly, 29 women brought home a gold medal, compared to the 17 gold medals brought home by male athletes. (more…)

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Photo by Pink Sherbet Photography

By Diana Gee

“….whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be slave of all.” Mark 10:43b-44

The past few days I’ve been thinking of the sad story of a young girl who recently died by suicide as a result of peer abuse. (more…)

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Photo by vonSchnauzer

By Debbie Gin

During my recent trip to Asia, I was surprised by two things — both of which continue to keep my mind busy and unsettled, so I share them here in hopes for some dialogue.

The first surprise (even after seeing many movies set in Hong Kong) was the realization that Hong Kong is almost all hills.  As such, directions to a location come in three dimensions.  (more…)

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