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Archive for the ‘Debbie’ Category

One of my denomination’s (Presbyterian Church (USA)) confessions of faith includes this sentence:  “the Spirit gives us courage…  to hear the voices of peoples long silenced…” (A Brief Statement of Faith, 70).   It takes courage to hear the silenced voices but it takes more courage for those voices to speak out . . . I was especially delighted to hear from Asian American women scholars, leaders and writers who wrote the book Mirrored Reflections: Reframing Biblical Characters.  One of the ongoing challenges doing ministry in many Asian American contexts is that Asian American women are often still doubly marginalized in male dominated ministries of Asian American churches.  The contributors of Mirrored Reflections have weaved their stories with the stories of women in the Bible that results in fresh and often startling interpretations that inform and empower Asian American women and men.

Kevin Park, on the AAWOL Authors Plenary & Response Panel at the Asian American Equipping Symposium II (February 2011)


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by Debbie Gin

Photo by SBA73

Have you ever wondered why a lot of the work done by women doesn’t get much credit? (That is, unless it’s women doing “men’s” work.)

I grew up in a Korean American household, where my mom did almost everything at home – cooking, cleaning, laundry, vacuuming, trash, yard work, paying the bills, dishwashing, attending to kids’ needs, sewing kids’ clothes – and worked (more…)

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Photo by Sweet Trade Photography

by Debbie Gin

I used to question my integrity a lot.  I felt twinges of shame whenever I interacted with people because I thought I wasn’t “the real me” in every context.  I behaved one way with my peers, another way with my family, and yet another way with my professors. I thought of myself as a fraud, a chameleon, easily changed by the presenting situation. At times, I even wondered whether I was “prostituting” myself out, becoming whatever my context needed me to be.

I also felt pressure to find my own path but felt conflicted on several levels. On the one hand, I resented my parents’ strong influence and expectations; (more…)

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